IMPORTANT BIRD AREAS PROGRAM
A Global Currency for Bird Conservation

A global initiative of BirdLife International, implemented by Audubon and local partners in the United States, the Important Bird Areas Program (IBA) is an effort to identify and conserve areas that are vital to birds and other biodiversity. By working with Audubon chapters, landowners, public agencies, community groups, and other non-profits, Audubon endeavors to interest and activate a broad network of supporters to ensure that all Important Bird Areas are properly managed and conserved.

Coupled with global warming, habitat loss and fragmentation are the most serious threats facing populations of birds across America and around the world. By working to identify and implement conservation strategies at Important Bird Areas, we hope to minimize the effects that habitat loss and degradation have on birds and other biodiversity. If we do not take action, populations of many birds may decline to dangerously low levels.

Watch the video below and explore our site to learn more about Important Bird Areas and how you can help.

Globally Important IBA Bolivar Flats Imperiled - Oil in Galveston Bay Threatens Tens of Thousands of Birds

168,000 gallons of residual fuel oil, a thick, tar-like substance, spilled into Galveston Bay after two vessels collided.The oil discharge has been stopped, but cleanup and containment have just begun. Oiled birds have already been found at Bolivar Flats, a Global Important Bird Area. Explore map of IBAs in the area or read more..

 

Check out what's happening at IBAs across the U.S!

Download our 2013 Highlights, including national level achievements and stories from across our U.S. Important Bird Areas network.

 

Explore Pacific Marine Important Bird Areas

Explore some of the most important places for seabirds, extending from the icy Beaufort Sea along Alaska’s north coast to the tropical seas of Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, in this newly released interactive map, packed with photos and fun facts about seabirds. Browse the newest marine IBAs and learn more about where seabirds nest and feed. The map represents 216 new and potential marine Important Bird Areas for over 33 million seabirds and 150 bird species, across a diversity of habitats ranging from tropical waters, rocky islands, vast open ocean, to the icy seas of the Arctic. Explore now...

Saving Important Bird Areas

23 projects across six countries and 18 states have been identified as targets for the Saving Important Bird Areas Initative. Learn more about this effort,one of the strategies we are using to focus conservation efforts...


Important Bird Areas in Danger
BirdLife International releases initial list of Important Bird Areas in Danger, including seven in the United States. Learn more...

BirdNote Features IBA Volunteers!


BirdNote recently highlighted a series of Important Bird Areas stories. Featured volunteers include Jim Brown of Five Valleys Audubon in Montana and Pete Pumphrey of Eastern Sierra Audubon and his work at Owens Lake in California.
Listen now to these BirdNote programs featuring Jim Brown and Pete Pumphrey. More programs on the way.

 

Important Bird Areas Profiles and Maps are Back!

Information about the status of the U.S and state IBA programs are available again, as well as Important Bird Area profiles and point maps. Click map below to find out more.


 

 

 

 

 

Updated March 2014



Status of Program



Share Your IBA Story
Tell us what's happening
at your IBA
Yellow-headed Blackbird,
Goose Lake IBA, MN
Kristin Hall

IBA Data Requests
Submit your online request


IBA Conservation Resources


Planting at San Pablo Bay, CA
Andrea Jones


Saving IBAs




Features IBA Volunteers

Jim Brown
Five Valleys Audubon, MT

Pete Pumphrey (Part I)
Eastern Sierra Audubon, CA

Pete Pumphrey (Part II)
Eastern Sierra Audubon, CA




Global IBAs


Greater Sage-Grouse,USFWS

Get Involved!
Upcoming IBA Events
and Opportunities




IBA Volunteer Days

 


Gulf IBAs


Neotropical Migrant IBAs

Landbirds

Dickcissel,
Steve Maslowski/USFWS

Waterbirds

Long-billed Curlew,
Gary Kramer/USFWS